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How to Prevent Cervical Cancer

Are you up to date with your cancer screening? Here are screening recommendations and tips for preventing cervical cancer.

Cervical cancer awareness and screenings, teal ribbon

Here's something every woman should know about cervical cancer: It's almost always preventable.

Cervical cancer is rare in women who are regularly screened for it. And there's a vaccine that protects against its most common cause, the human papillomavirus (HPV).
Here's a look at these two highly effective ways to prevent cervical cancer.

Stopping cancer with screening

Most cervical cancers start with precancerous changes that gradually turn into cancer. Screening can find these abnormal changes, which doctors can then treat. That stops cancer from ever developing.

Screening always includes the Pap test and, for some women, the HPV test. Both tests are simple and fast and consist of sample cells from the cervix. The Pap test looks for cell changes and abnormal cells, while the HPV test looks for the virus that causes cell changes.

Related: 3 Ways to Prevent Osteoarthritis


Be sure to ask your doctor what the best screening schedule is for you. But in the meantime, here's what the American Cancer Society advises for most women:

• Starting at 21 and through age 29, get a Pap test every three years.*
• Starting at age 30, you have a choice. Either get a Pap test every three years or get both a Pap test and an HPV test every five years.*

*These are recommendations if you’ve had a negative result. If you’ve had a result that isn’t normal, the recommendations for follow-up differ based on age, test results, and whether both Pap and HPV tests were done. Check with your doctor to see what follow-up is best for you.

It's okay to stop testing if you're older than 65 and have had normal Pap test results for many years. It's also okay to stop if you've had a total hysterectomy—both your uterus and cervix have been removed—for a noncancerous condition like fibroids.

Related: Getting an Annual Mammogram Could Save Your Life

Taking a shot at cancer

There are more than 200 types of HPV. But two—both spread through sexual contact—cause roughly 70% of cervical cancers. The HPV vaccine targets those two types.

Even so, the vaccine can't treat an HPV infection that has already developed. That's why it's best for people to get the shot before they become sexually active. Vaccination should start at age 11 or 12 for both boys and girls. But men and women 26 and younger can still be vaccinated. If you’re older than 26 and haven’t been sexually active, the vaccine may also be beneficial (because health plans differ, this may not be covered by your plan).

The vaccine can protect against several other cancers, including anal, throat, and penile cancer.

While you’re here, check out our other articles on healthy living. For information on our medical and dental plans, visit selecthealth.org/plans.

Additional references: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; National Cancer Institute; U.S. Preventive Services Task Force




SelectHealth may link to other websites for your convenience. SelectHealth does not expressly or implicitly recommend or endorse the views, opinions, specific services, or products referenced at other websites linked to the SelectHealth site, unless explicitly stated.


The content presented here is for your information only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, and it should not be used to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns.

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Post Author

Sandy Patton

Sandy is a Marketing Communications Specialist and has been with SelectHealth for 15 years. Her prior roles include health education and wellness coaching.