< Blog Home

Why Kids Need the Measles Vaccine

For parents: Here’s what you should know about the measles vaccine.

Little girl getting the measles vaccine, why get vaccinated

As a parent, you've likely heard about this year's measles outbreak. It's the highest number of measles cases the U.S. has seen since 1994. And most of those cases have occurred among unvaccinated people.

Some parents choose not to get their kids vaccinated because they're concerned about the vaccine's safety. But research shows that the measles vaccine is safe. It does not cause other diseases or conditions such as autism.

In contrast, the effects of measles itself can sometimes be severe in young children. It leads to complications like pneumonia and brain swelling, and in rare cases, children even die from measles.

What's more, measles is highly contagious. You can get it just from being in a room within a couple of hours after a person with measles has been in it. And measles is more likely to spread through communities where people aren't vaccinated. This is a big risk for people who can't be vaccinated against measles, such as babies less than a year old.

Related: Measles and Mumps: Here's What You Need to Know

Measles was virtually eradicated in the U.S., thanks to vaccinations. But outbreaks, like the one this year, still occur when unvaccinated travelers from the U.S. get the disease overseas and then bring it back.

The measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine protects children from measles. Two doses are needed—the first one at 12 to 15 months old and the second at 4 to 6 years old.

If you have questions about measles vaccines for your child, ask your doctor.

As a SelectHealth member, recommended immunizations are generally covered at no cost to you. Visit our preventive care page and refer to your member materials for preventive care coverage and for more information on immunizations and other covered services.

While you’re here, check out our other articles on healthy living. For information on our medical and dental plans, visit selecthealth.org/plans

 

 

References: American Academy of Family Physicians; American Academy of Pediatrics; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

You might also like..
Other Articles